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Kent Moger
Kent Moger

Subtitle Notorious


You can use the Kripto Video Protector & Media Player to watch music videos with subtitles, listen audio music files with Synchronized Lyrics (.LRC) or with Subtitle (.SRT) file. You can also get subtitles for your movies or TV series automatically with the application.




subtitle Notorious



A hapless wanna be gangster, Sing, must overcome his inability to wield a knife and demonstrate his mettle in order to become a member of the notorious Axe Gang. The Axe Gang, meanwhile, want to reign supreme by occupying the most coveted territory, which is a sacred street protected by an unlikely cast of characters, many of whom are highly skilled kung fu masters disguised as ordinary people. After several encounters with thugs and a fearsome adversary known as the Beast, Sing overcomes his inadequacy and realizes he is the greatest kung fu master of them all, destined to protect the sacred street.


Drascula: The Vampire Strikes Back is a classic humorous 2D point and clickadventure game, first released by Alcachofa Soft S.L. in 1996.In Drascula you play the role of John Hacker, a British estate agent, thatgets to meet a gorgeous blond girl who is kidnapped by the notorious vampireCount Drascula and embark on a fun yet dangerous quest to rescue her.Unfortunately Hacker is not aware of Drascula's real ambitions:DOMINATING the World and demonstrating that he is even more evil than hisbrother Vlad.This is the Spanish version of Drascula: The Vampire Strikes Back. It alsofeatures voice output and subtitles in Spanish.Please install the drascula-music package to enjoy the background music of thegame. There are furthermore additional language packages available withsubtitles in German, French and Italian.Note that this package only contains game-data. The game engine is provided byScummVM. Tags: Games and Amusement: Adventure, Hardware Enablement: Mouse, Role: Application Data, Purpose: Game Playing


N2 - As a child growing up in Cambodia, Ronnie Yimsut played among the ruins of the Angkor Wat temples, surrounded by a close-knit community. As the Khmer Rouge gained power and began its genocidal reign of terror, his life became a nightmare. In this stunning memoir, Yimsut describes how, in the wake of death and destruction, he decides to live. Escaping the turmoil of Cambodia, he makes a perilous journey through the jungle into Thailand, only to be sent to a notorious Thai prison. Fortunately, he is able to reach a refugee camp and ultimately migrate to the United States, where he attended the University of Oregon and became an influential leader in the community of Cambodian immigrants. Facing the Khmer Rouge shows Ronnie Yimsut's personal quest to rehabilitate himself, make a new life in America, and then return to Cambodia to help rebuild the land of his birth.


AB - As a child growing up in Cambodia, Ronnie Yimsut played among the ruins of the Angkor Wat temples, surrounded by a close-knit community. As the Khmer Rouge gained power and began its genocidal reign of terror, his life became a nightmare. In this stunning memoir, Yimsut describes how, in the wake of death and destruction, he decides to live. Escaping the turmoil of Cambodia, he makes a perilous journey through the jungle into Thailand, only to be sent to a notorious Thai prison. Fortunately, he is able to reach a refugee camp and ultimately migrate to the United States, where he attended the University of Oregon and became an influential leader in the community of Cambodian immigrants. Facing the Khmer Rouge shows Ronnie Yimsut's personal quest to rehabilitate himself, make a new life in America, and then return to Cambodia to help rebuild the land of his birth.


Those who fail to pay attention to the subtitle of Simon C[orcoran]'s bookmight be initially perplexed by its content. For this is nostraightforwardly analytical narrative of the empire of Diocletian, hiscolleagues and immediate successors. What it is, in fact, is anunashamedly technical monograph on the nature of therule--imperium(empire) in the sense of governing authority--asdeveloped under that system of collegiate government, instituted byDiocletian, which modern scholars term the Tetrarchy. In fact C. extendshis coverage beyond the narrow confines of the period of the classicTetrarchy, in which there were exactly four emperors, to encompass thewhole of Diocletian's reign from his accession in A.D. 284 right downuntil Constantine's defeat and deposition of his imperial colleague,Licinius, in 324. This only incidentally makes a neat period of fortyyears; for the periodisation, far from being arbitrary, accuratelyunderscores C.'s vision of the essence of the tetrarchic government: thecollegiate rule, within a defined hierarchy, of two or more emperorsunconnected by immediate consanguineity. This latter criterion needs to bestressed because it should be remembered that imperial colleges were noDiocletianic innovation. Diocletian himself succeeded immediately upon theunravelling of the previous college of Carus, Carinus and Numerian.Moreover collegiate rule was not extinguished in 324 but rather revertedto the earlier dynastic pattern. Of course, even within the bounds of C.'streatment, Constantine is a partial exception, being the son of one of theoriginal Tetrarchs, but while he still shared power with Licinius theprinciple of Diocletian's Tetrarchy was not dead.


C.'s subject is not so much why was there a Tetrarchy but how did itoperate; crucially how did the various members of the imperial collegeinteract, given the novelty of this relationship? As indicated by hissubtitle C.'s raw material is the legal output of the imperial regime,which across this period is diverse in terms of both source and genre. Forthe period 284--295 private rescripts (replies to petitions) originallycollected in the Gregorian and Hermogenianic Codices, and survivingthrough incorporation in the Codex Iustinianus provide the bulk ofthe material, while for the period from roughly 313 onwards it is thepublic edicts and letters to officials collected in the CodexTheodosianus that predominate. The gap left is largely filled,somewhat fortuitously, by the most notorious edicts of the tetrarchicperiod relating to the currency, maximum prices and the persecution andtoleration of Christianity, known to us from literary and epigraphicsources. It is one of the major strengths of C.'s book that these oftenwell-known but disparate materials are considered together in a singlestudy.


Aside from these main conclusions it is easy to lose sight of the manyimportant insights C. offers into contingent questions in the wealth ofdetail both pertinent and incidental which characterizes this monograph.One such example is his discussion of rescripts in the CodexTheodosianus (163-67); another his discussion of CJ 3.11.1 asrevealing the perspective of the imperial court as unequivocally no longerItalo-centric (172); and again his important conclusions on the nature oflegislative competence and imperium within the tetrarchic system a\propos the edict ad Bithynos of 317 (283-84). Throughout C.exhibits a (commendable) distaste for emendation of his source materialand is notably cautious when he does venture to do so (e.g., on CJ1.13.1, p. 307). On the aesthetic side, the book has clearly beenproof-read to a very high standard, typographic errors being very few andfar between.[[6]] The overall impression is only marred by theembarrassing 'Literare [sic] Humaniores' appearing on thehalf-title, for which the author can bear no blame. In sum, althoughserving as a work of reference as much as of synthesis (being equippedwith a very helpful index locorum), readers who are not put off byits openly technical nature (exemplified by the presence of eightappendices) will be repaid by a book which offers more than the subtitleinitially promises.


Lydgate's many and varied productions, with their countless and complex engagements with the world (that is, with "mundanity"), do indeed form a capacious vehicle for a study of, as the volume's subtitle terms, "poetry and material culture in the fifteenth century." In the end, however, because (as Cooper and Denny-Brown acknowledge) the contributions approach materiality in so many different ways--ranging from, say, the historicity transmitted in the excess of the literary (Maura Nolan) to the material relations among the merchants and civic leaders of Lydgate's London patronage network (Michelle R. Warren)--I found the focus of the book less coherently discernable than the subtitle and introduction suggest. Put positively, this is to say that the idea of volume, while plainly a touchstone for each of the contributions, never obstructs the specific interests and energies of the contributors. As a result, while the collection's overall conclusions regarding poetry and material culture may remain uncertain, it fully succeeds as a multidimensional contribution to Lydgate studies, intervening in critical debates, providing new readings (often of relatively neglected poems), supplying rich and revealing historical and textual contextualizations, and deepening our grasp of Lydgatean poetics.


Two chapters and Smith's afterword--while they each, like the contributions of the second category, offer poetic elucidations--put forth arguments about the nature of Lydgate's poetics. John Ganim explores what he names Lydgate's "poetics of exemption," by which he means the discursive strategies whereby the privileges of monasticism in general and Bury St. Edmunds in particular may be textualized alongside and within an ostensibly unrelated discourse involving other, potentially competing interests. He argues that Lydgate's aptitude in this regard made his work attractive to patrons across the sociopolitical spectrum (as well as a model for other poets), since this poetics may easily be marshaled for a defense of something else, such as royal power or mercantile civic authority. Ganim shows how this poetics operates in such poems as the Lives of Saints Edmund and Fremund and the Miracles of Saint Edmund (perhaps not by Lydgate), emphasizing the role of the rhetoric of place--and its literal specification--in the defense of privilege. Nolan contributes a wonderfully head-spinning, yet entirely convincing, reading of Lydgate's Treatise for Lauandres. Through a careful account of the literary precedents and manuscript contexts for this short poem about stain removal (Lydgate's "worst poem," her title announces), she demonstrates that it in fact signifies in a multilayered, poetically sophisticated manner, and that it brings together the sacred and profane even while leaving their relation, to a degree, open. This reading leads to larger reflections on "what the category 'literary' might mean, both during the late medieval and early modern periods and for medievalists now" (72-73). Nolan argues, among other things, that literariness occurs as an excess of signification, and that it is through identification of this excess that we may "genuinely grasp the historicity of a medieval poem" (82). Like Nolan, Smith in his afterword is also concerned with how Lydgate's poetic practice points us to larger questions about the nature of the literary aesthetic. Tackling Lydgate's notorious rendition of the opening sentence of the Canterbury Tales in the Siege of Thebes, he argues that Lydgate's open-ended syntax here and elsewhere, his frequent use of the refrain or refrain-like structures, and, most generally, his rhetorical copia reflect, in contrast with Chaucer's comparatively closed forms, a "lyricist's desire for the world, the sadness at its passing away" (185). In a Hegelian sense, "Lydgate's use of amplification is the greatest sign of his tremendous capacity for tarrying with the negative" (189). 041b061a72


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